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Positioning Gender and Race in (Post)colonial Plantation by E. Stoddard

By E. Stoddard

Stoddard uses the Anglophone Caribbean and eire to check the advanced inflections of girls and race as articulated in-between the colonial discursive and fabric formations of the eighteenth century and people of the (post)colonial 20th century, as dependent by way of the outlined areas of the colonizers' estates.

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Positioning Gender and Race in (Post)colonial Plantation Space: Connecting Ireland and the Caribbean

Stoddard uses the Anglophone Caribbean and eire to ascertain the complicated inflections of girls and race as articulated in-between the colonial discursive and fabric formations of the eighteenth century and people of the (post)colonial 20th century, as based through the outlined areas of the colonizers' estates.

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Also in the 1920s and the 1930s, there were a series of unions formed and strikes called that led to the leadership of Grantley Adams, an Oxford-educated Barbadian of African descent. While black women played a dominant role in the enslaved labor forces that built the Barbados sugar industry, as the movement toward unionizing and later independence intensified, women slipped into the background of the story. Sugar became less and less profitable and plantation owners went into debt. In 1966, Barbados became independent of Britain and tourism increasingly took the place of sugar as the main source of foreign exchange.

The cycle of the seasons and the nature of the cane dictated where and how it should be planted, nurtured and harvested. Weeding time, planting, cutting the cane, its conversion to sugar and transport to the wharves, were regular and unvarying activities which made their mark on the social activities and psychology of all concerned and played an essential part in their creolization. (134) Thus spatial and temporal relations were almost entirely shaped by the cultivation of sugarcane in a highly polarized racialized system.

The second chapter sets the literary stage for the post-colonial novels I use in the succeeding four chapters. I analyze the unfolding of racial and colonial relations through a genealogy of novels about women incarcerated in great houses. The Anglo-Irish genre of fiction centering on the big houses and the landlord class began with Maria Edgeworth’s Castle Rackrent in 1800. Edgeworth was the daughter of an improving Anglo-Irish landlord, managing his estate herself. I look at the imprisonment of Lady Kit in Castle Rackrent as an echo of similar acts that occurred in Edgeworth’s area, including at Belvedere House, and as a pre-text for Charlotte Brönte’s Jane Eyre.

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